Thanks Tom!

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Thanks Tom!"An alumni board is traditionally anchored by older, more experienced," he says, "but I think, today more than ever, it’s critical to get some of the younger alumni who have lived in the current environment involved in the board."

With the current changes sweeping across Greek life nationally, Hebel thinks it's time to bring new ideas and new perspectives into leadership; perspectives that may be more closely related to the current atmosphere. "I think that's a direction we really need to be moving in," he adds.

But not everything should be focused on looking ahead. When looking back on his college experience, Hebel mentions that what made Phi Kappa Sigma so different from other fraternities, was what made it perfect for him.

"We weren't quite as Greek as other fraternities… we were a lot closer as an individual group of people than we were as fraternity brothers."

That's not to say the bond of brotherhood wasn't there and Hebel was just there to have a good time with his friends. Rather, it was a different, deeper, more meaningful type of brotherhood.

"A good number of our members weren't interested in fraternity living; they were interested in Phi Kappa Sigma living," he explains. "The majority of us back in the mid-70s, we were Phi Kaps; we weren't fraternity members."

And that brotherhood remains strong to this day, but it's more than friendship stemming from the good ol' college days. For Hebel, it's something much deeper. "I know lots of folks who went to Penn State and were in different groups… but nobody, none of those people, have the breadth and depth of bond that we Phi Kaps have."

In fact, when asked about his advice for younger Phi Kaps, everything came back to the unique bond of brotherhood that grows from Phi Kappa Sigma. "Don't take it too lightly, the relationships you're creating now. They might not seem as important to you today as they will twenty or thirty or forty years later, and you just can't get them anywhere else."

Despite a busy personal life, working and serving in his community, Hebel still makes sure he takes time to meet up with his brothers. "I just had a dozen of my fellow Phi Kaps who graduated in '76, '77 and '78 together for a golf outing down in North Carolina, and it could have been more," he shares. "It could have been 15 or 20. It speaks volumes to say that my best friends today were my best friends in 1975."

Hebel's busy life and other commitments have also played a role in his decision to step down from the board, but his gifts of time and service will not easily be forgotten.

Thanks Tom!
A Famous Tom Hebel Tailgate

"I am truly grateful for his service and steadfast commitment to our House," says former Alumni President Mark Bokelman ‘82. "His sage advice will forever be appreciated."

When asked how he would describe Hebel's dedication to the board, he says, "I would sum it up in three words: sincere, honorable and fraternal. Tom has been a positive influence on the House since he pledged in the 70s and, personally, he is in my Psi Chapter Hall of Fame."

Just because he will no longer be on the board, however, doesn't me Hebel won't still be involved.

"There's a couple different types of involved," he explains, "and I think it's important to understand that. There's the fraternal involvement, which is a little more difficult to organize and little bit less well supported, and I'll still be there when the call comes out and they need me to do whatever it is they need me to do.

"And then there's the other involvement, which is personal involvement. …That's easier because there's no obligation. All it is, is being connected."

His ongoing support and dedication hasn't been missed by his brothers. "When he stepped down from the board," Bokelman says, "Tom graciously noted that he would try to do his best to help out when and where he can. To me," he adds, "that embodies 'Once a Phi Kap, Always a Phi Kap.'"

“I’ll always remember Tom’s insight,” said Alumni Vice President Michael Rycheck ‘87. “The great landscaping at the House is due to Tom, Rycheck added. I will also remember his tailgates, which were very warm and welcoming occasions.”

And always a Phi Kap Hebel will be. As his official service time comes to an end, he encourages other brothers to become more involved. "There's always a need for someone to step up and say, 'I'll help out,' or 'I'll take the lead.'

"If people would step up and get involved that’s how fraternities are successful. … And we all have different talents to offer."

spite a busy personal life, working and serving in his community, Hebel still makes sure he takes time to meet up with his brothers. "I just had a dozen of my fellow Phi Kaps who graduated in '76, '77 and '78 together for a golf outing down in North Carolina, and it could have been more," he shares. "It could have been 15 or 20. It speaks volumes to say that my best friends today were my best friends in 1975."

Hebel's busy life and other commitments have also played a role in his decision to step down from the board, but his gifts of time and service will not easily be forgotten.

"I am truly grateful for his service and steadfast commitment to our House," says former Alumni President Mark Bokelman ‘82. "His sage advice will forever be appreciated."

When asked how he would describe Hebel's dedication to the board, he says, "I would sum it up in three words: sincere, honorable and fraternal. Tom has been a positive influence on the House since he pledged in the 70s and, personally, he is in my Psi Chapter Hall of Fame."

Just because he will no longer be on the board, however, doesn't me Hebel won't still be involved.

"There's a couple different types of involved," he explains, "and I think it's important to understand that. There's the fraternal involvement, which is a little more difficult to organize and little bit less well supported, and I'll still be there when the call comes out and they need me to do whatever it is they need me to do.

"And then there's the other involvement, which is personal involvement. …That's easier because there's no obligation. All it is, is being connected."

His ongoing support and dedication hasn't been missed by his brothers. "When he stepped down from the board," Bokelman says, "Tom graciously noted that he would try to do his best to help out when and where he can. To me," he adds, "that embodies 'Once a Phi Kap, Always a Phi Kap.'"

“I’ll always remember Tom’s insight,” said Alumni Vice President Michael Rycheck ‘87. “The great landscaping at the House is due to Tom, Rycheck added. I will also remember his tailgates, which were very warm and welcoming occasions.”

And always a Phi Kap Hebel will be. As his official service time comes to an end, he encourages other brothers to become more involved. "There's always a need for someone to step up and say, 'I'll help out,' or 'I'll take the lead.'

"If people would step up and get involved that’s how fraternities are successful. … And we all have different talents to offer."