Remembering Traditions

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If there’s one thing we're certain about in 2020, it’s that everything is uncertain. Just ask any corporate advertisement ever (watch
this video for a laugh). 

New announcements about fall at Penn State are coming out every day, and it seems like many of our favorite campus activities are being postponed, moved online, or even cancelled altogether. Many universities are cancelling athletics too, meaning we’re likely to miss our favorite tailgates and homecoming in State College. 

Current Nittany Lions may miss out on many of the things we loved about our Penn Stateexperience. But in the midst of these unfortunate cancellations, we suggest looking back on better days. In remembering our traditions, we reassure ourselves that someday they will return, for us and future generations of Nittany Lions to enjoy. 

We’d like to remind you of 3 traditions that made coming back to campus feel like coming home. 

  1. White Out - The first White Out game didn’t take place until 2004 — and it was against Purdue, if you can believe it — it became a hollowed tradition so quickly because of the 2005 game against Ohio State. After two disappointing seasons in 2003 and 2004, the Lions came into the evening 5-0 and ready to reestablish themselves on the national stage. The fans were also looking to make a name for themselves, and they did, creating an atmosphere that Kirk Herbsreit called the best in the country.
  2. Thon - The Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon, or THON, is the largest student-run philanthropy in the world.
  3. The "We Are" chant - The babyface version of the origin story involves the Nittany Lions taking a stand against racism by refusing to travel to a game at Miami without their two African-American players. In reality, the iconic cheer was created in 1977 and was inspired by Ohio State’s “O-H-I-O.” Either way, the “We Are” chant is as loud and obnoxious as any in the nation, and it sounds amazing when you’re in Beaver Stadium for a night game